Chandrayaan-3: A step towards change (Conquer the moon)

Chandrayaan-3 Landed at 18:04 IST: It’s not a miracle, it’s the hard work and dedication that landed India on the south pole of the moon successfully in the second attempt. It’s a golden day 23

2 0
Read Time:9 Minute, 59 Second

Chandrayaan-3 Landed at 18:04 IST:

It’s not a miracle, it’s the hard work and dedication that landed India on the south pole of the moon successfully in the second attempt. It’s a golden day 23 August 2023 at 18:04 IST, ISRO said that things are going smoothly but even if there were any errors, we will be able to land on the moon smoothly. Though the space agency has a backup plan and the landing would be moved to 27 August 2023 if the spacecraft is unable to make a landing. This momentous accomplishment of ISRO marks a significant step forward for India’s space exploration ambitions and adds to the country’s growing reputation as a prominent player in space science.

History of Moon landing:

India is becoming the 4th country who accomplish this soft landing on the moon. Till now only three nations are in this list of selected groups – the United States, the former Soviet Union, and most recently, China. Before landing on the Moon successfully, both the US and the USSR suffered multiple spacecraft accidents while with the Chang’e-3 mission in 2013, China stands out as the only nation to get success in its first attempt.

 

India's previous Moon Mission: - All You Need To Know

                       Chandrayaan-1

Chandrayaan-1 (pronunciation (help·info); from Sanskrit: Chandra, “Moon” and yāna, “craft, vehicle”) was the first Indian lunar probe under the Chandrayaan program. It was launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation(ISRO) in October 2008, and operated until August 2009. The mission included an orbiter and a MIP. India launched the spacecraft using a PSLV-XL rocket on 22 October 2008 at 00:52 UTC from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, at Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh. The mission was a major boost to India’s space program, as India researched and developed indigenous technology to explore the Moon. The vehicle was inserted into lunar orbit on 8 November 2008.

On 14 November 2008, the Moon Impact Probe separated from the Chandrayaan orbiter at 14:36 UTC and struck the south pole in a controlled manner. The probe hit near the crater Shackleton at 15:01 UTC. The location of impact was named Jawahar Point. With this mission, ISRO became the fifth national space agency to reach the lunar surface. Other nations whose national space agencies have done so prior were the former Soviet Union in 1959, the United States in 1962, Japan in 1993, and ESA member states in 2006. With an estimated cost for the project was ₹386 crore (US$88.73 million), it was intended to survey the lunar surface over a two-year period, to produce a complete map of the chemical composition at the surface and three-dimensional topography. The polar regions are of special interest as they might contain water ice. Among its many achievements was the discovery of the widespread presence of water molecules in lunar soil. After almost a year, the orbiter started experiencing several technical issues including failure of the star tracker and poor thermal shielding; Chandrayaan-1 stopped communicating at about 20:00 UTC on 28 August 2009, shortly after which the ISRO officially declared that the mission was over. Chandrayaan-1 operated for 312 days as opposed to the intended two years; however, the mission achieved most of its scientific objectives including detecting the presence of Lunar water.
On 2 July 2016, NASA used ground-based radar systems to relocate Chandrayaan-1 in its lunar orbit, almost seven years after it shut down. Repeated observations over the next three months allowed a precise determination of its orbit which varies between 150 and 270 km (93 and 168 mi) in altitude every two years.

Source:  wikipedia
Chandrayaan-1

                       Chandrayaan-2

Chandrayaan-2 (pronunciation (help·info); from Sanskrit: Chandra, “Moon” and yāna, “craft, vehicle”), is the second lunar exploration mission developed by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), after Chandrayaan-1. It consists of a lunar orbiter and formerly included the Vikram lander and the Pragyan rover, all of which were developed in India. The main scientific objective is to map and study the variations in lunar surface composition, as well as the location and abundance of lunar water. The spacecraft was launched from the second launch pad at the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Andhra Pradesh on 22 July 2019 at 09:13:12 UTC by a LVM3-M1 rocket. The craft reached the lunar orbit on 20 August 2019 and began orbital positioning manoeuvres for the landing of the Vikram lander. The lander and the rover were scheduled to land on the near side of the Moon, in the south polar region at a latitude of about 70° south on 6 September 2019. However, the lander crashed when it deviated from its intended trajectory while attempting to land on 6 September 2019. According to a failure analysis report submitted to ISRO, the crash was caused by a software glitch.

Chandrayaan-2 launch was scheduled for 14 July 2019, 21:21 UTC (15 July 2019 at 02:51 IST local time), with the landing expected on 6 September 2019. However, the launch was aborted due to a technical glitch and was rescheduled. The launch occurred on 22 July 2019 at 09:13:12 UTC (14:43:12 IST) on the first operational flight of a GSLV MK III M1.
On 6 September 2019, the lander during its landing phase, deviated from its intended trajectory starting at 2.1 km (1.3 mi) altitude and had lost communication when touchdown confirmation was expected. Initial reports suggesting a crash were confirmed by ISRO chairman K. Sivan, stating that “it must have been a hard landing”. The Failure Analysis Committee concluded that the crash was caused by a software glitch. Unlike ISRO’s previous record, the report of the Failure Analysis Committee has not been made public.

Source:  wikipedia
chandrayaan-2

A soft landing on the lunar surface was the main goal of Chandrayaan-3, the third lunar mission in India’s Chandrayaan series, which would launch on July 14, 2023. The difficulties encountered by the 2019-launched Chandrayaan-2 mission during its attempt to land on the moon stoked increased resolve inside ISRO to overcome the obstacle.

As Chandrayaan-3 started to descend towards the Moon’s surface, the critical time arrived. Engineers and scientists at the ISRO mission control center were under a lot of pressure as they constantly monitored the telemetry data in the hopes of a perfect launch. The lander’s fall had been precisely planned, and its thrusters had fired in exact successions to reduce speed and ensure a soft landing. The entire world held its breath as the final landing sequence unfolded amid heart-pounding moments. The landing legs of Chandrayaan-3 then touched the lunar surface with the gentlest of touches. As it became clear that the mission had succeeded in landing safely on the Moon, there were cheers throughout the mission control center.

Design:-

Chandrayaan-3 comprises three main components: Propulsion module, Lander(Vikram), and Rover(Pragyan). Chandrayaan-3 mission cost India $75 million, significantly lower than Russia’s Luna-25 mission, which cost $200 million.

Craft Name         Chandrayaan 3
Manufacturer    ISRO
Launch Date      14 July 2023
Landing Date     23 August 2023
Landing Time    6:04 PM IST
Speed while touching the lunar surface 1.68 km/s
Official Website isro.gov.in

ISRO imprints its mark on the Moon’s surface- 

As Chandrayaan-3 begins its mission of exploration and discovery, the world awaits the astounding discoveries and insights that will definitely result from this extraordinary venture. Each successful mission brings us one step closer to solving the mysteries of our cosmic neighbor and broadening our grasp of the universe.

The moon landing site of the lander Vikram would be known as “Shiv Shakti Point:

When PM Modi was at the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) headquarters in Bengaluru to congratulate the brilliant minds of Scientists and engineers behind Chandrayaan-3. By making the announcement, PM Modi said, “In general, there has been a tradition across the world with such kinds of successful missions, to give a name to that point.”

Shiv Shakti Point

This successful landing of Chandrayaan-3 is a testament to the dedication, innovation, and determination of ISRO and its collaborators. This achievement not only furthers our understanding of the Moon but also inspires future generations to reach for the stars and push the boundaries of human exploration.

Rover "Pragyan" find elements on Moon -

On 30 August, as per the report ‘Pragyan’ rover of Chandrayaan-3 ‘unambiguously confirmed’ the presence of sulphur on the lunar surface near the south pole. Also detected other elements like Aluminum (Al), Calcium (Ca), Iron (Fe), Chromium (Cr), Titanium (Ti), Manganese (Mn), Silicon (Si), and Oxygen (O). ISRO further added that the search for Hydrogen (H) is underway. Meanwhile, scientists said that the rover(‘Pragyan’) is currently in a “race against time” with ISRO working to cover a maximum distance of the uncharted South Pole through this six-wheeled vehicle. “We have only 14 days in total for this mission, which is equal to one day on the moon, so four days have been completed. The more experiments and research we can do in the remaining ten days will be important. We are in a race against time because in these 10 days, we have to do maximum work and all the ISRO scientists are working on it, – ” Nilesh M. Desai, Director, Space Applications Centre”.

"National Space Day"

"National Space Day"

PM Modi said earlier on Saturday that the region where the Chandrayaan-3 Vikram lander made a soft landing will be designated as "Shiv Shakti Point," and the site where the Chandrayaan-2 lander crashed-landed on the Moon's surface in 2019 would be known as "Tiranga Point." Modi also declared August 23, the day the Chandrayaan-3 lander touched down on the lunar surface, to be "National Space Day."

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
100 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

wpChatIcon